Trent University Celebrating 50 Years

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Trent University Campus

Trent University campus – A River runs through it

Peterborough is very proud of its university located in the north end of the City of Peterborough on the Otonabee River.  Community leaders dreamed of a university in the early 1960s and with the leadership of Professor Tom Symons and generous community support and land donations in the Nassau Mills area from General Electric, Trent university started in 1963 and officially opened in 1964 with downtown facilities.  Trent began as a small liberal arts school which featured small group teaching and a tutorial system with a residential college system.  For the first decade everybody knew everybody else and there was much interaction between “Town and Gown” with activities in the city which housed two of the university’s colleges, Peter Robinson College for male students (now closed) and Catherine Parr Traill College for female students (now the home of graduate studies).  The administration was located in Rubidge Hall in town in the early days and now is located on the Nassau Mills campus in the still beautiful Bata library on the west bank of the river.  Trent now has more diverse programs and the science area has grown greatly with new buildings on the east bank.  Champlain College opened for male students in 1967 and Lady Eaton College for female students opened in 1968.  The two colleges and the library were the centrepieces of the brilliant campus architecture of Ronald Thom, which integrated nature with university buildings, in harmony.  Within a few years society had changed and the gender divisions were removed from the colleges.  The campus added co-ed Otonabee College in 1972 and Peter Gzowski College in 2003.  The college system was and still is a major part of the Trent system and values. There is now a student residence across the road from the west bank campus and it is not associated with a College.

With over 8,000 full time students Trent is now a medium sized university with 50 years of loyal alumni.  Trent has become a leading institution for Canadian studies, environment, indigenous studies and even has a nursing programme. Trent has changed with the times but retains the values and vision of its founding president Tom Symons pictured below then and now:

 

Trent's Founding President

Young President Symons

Tom Symons now

Retired Tom Symons

Trent has big plans for the coming year with 50th Anniversary celebrations and hopes to involve many people in reunions and commemorative events.  There is an Alumni Reunion Weekend in early August featuring a Blue Rodeo concert and many other activities.  On October 17 there will be a Gala Dinner and a Parade on October 18th. For other events and more specific information visit the university website: Trentu.ca

 

Peterborough’s Hunter Street Bridge

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Fall Colours

View of Otonabee River from Hunter Street Bridge

Our primary symbols for this website are taken from the Hunter Street Bridge which connects downtown Peterborough with the East City across the river. We see this bridge as a key Peterborough landmark with great importance to Peterborough’s history almost equal to the Peterborough Liftlock. The bridge unites the City of Peterborough downtown east and west of the Otonabee River. The East City, as it is now known, was originally the Village of Ashburnham, before it was annexed by the Town of Peterborough in 1904. With an expanded population Peterborough became a city in 1905. There were earlier bridges across the river at Hunter Street but the current Hunter Street Bridge was originally built between 1919 and 1921 and was restored recently, reopening in August 2012. The $8 Million restoration project included 88 terra cotta shamrocks in the railing at the centre, the railing itself, other terra cotta elements including crests of armour and the “Peterborough” inlays at the center, and the large light standards at each end and the middle of the bridge.  Hunter Street is one of Peterborough’s more vibrant streets with many excellent restaurants and other businesses on both sides of the Hunter Street Bridge.

Our website Twitter account @PtboDotOrg uses a shamrock from the Hunter Street bridge as its profile photo.

 

 

New Large Provincial Park in Peterborough County

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7th largest Ontario provincial park

Peterborough’s new Kawartha Highlands Park

Peterborough has a large new Provincial Park consisting of 375.87 km2 (92,879.5 acres).  Kawartha Highlands Provincial Park is the 7th largest Provincial Park in Ontario and takes up a large part of Peterborough County. It is 50 km. north of the City of Peterborough and includes all of Anstruther Lake where there are cottages and a number of other lakes in the northwest quadrant of Peterborough County.  It is one of 9 “Signature Sites” in the Ontario parks system and is the most southern of the Signature Sites.  It has recently (in 2011) begun to provide 108 organized back country campsites and limited other facilities for visitors. Access to campsites is by canoe or kayak. Winter camping is allowed by permit only. Reservations are made centrally through Parks Ontario as there is no in park central facility. Click here to reserve a campsite. There is fishing for small mouth bass, large mouth bass, lake trout, brook trout and northern pike. Regulated hunting is allowed too. There are six established canoe routes through the Park and most of the campsites exist along the canoe routes where they informally existed for many years before. This new park in cottage country dwarfs nearby Petroglyphs Provincial Park, a historic site for day use only. Kawartha Highlands Park was in a planning stage from 1997 and became chartered as a park with legislation passed in 2003. A regulation proclaimed April 21, 2005 made this vast area a Provincial Park. It has many access points which are not controlled like those of most other parks. Its Existing residential cottage use has been allowed to continue with all other lands in the park boundary publicly owned and environmentally protected. Kawartha Highlands Park is classified as a “Natural Environment Park” and considered to be “Semi Wilderness”. It is a great place to explore in Peterborough County. If you visit the park please share your experience with a comment on this post or by tweeting using #Ptbo

Ontario's 7th largest park

A treasure of Peterborough and the Kawarthas